Loctite – Works Great! Which Do I Use?

I read this short article from Fusion Firearms and thought some of you may enjoy reading it as well.  We’ve all heard of “purple,” ‘blue,” “red,” “yellow, “and “green” Loctite, but what do those colors really mean?  Read this, you may be surprised!

LoctiteBob’s 1911 Tech Tip:

1911 Gunsmithing & Loctite.

Loctite adhesives have been used in many mechanical assembly applications for years. This is widespread through basically all industry sectors and the firearms industry is no different. Many old manufacturing methods such as staking parts have been replaced by space-age adhesives.

The biggest issue I see in many random 1911 services: folks don’t understand which type to use from the 100’s of products that are available. Or hearing “I used the green Loctite.” Which doesn’t mean much when there are 15 different Loctite with the color green and they all have different uses.

Well, I can make it simple and narrow it down to 3 Loctites that you should use.

  1. Loctite 242 or equivalent: For most sight screws, barrel threads, or screws that may be backing out on you from vibration. This adhesive is more of a “gumming” agent and you can also remove the screw with standard tools after it cures. This will work for most applications.
  1. Loctite 271 or equivalent:  For sight retaining screws, sight bases, sight dovetails etc.. that you wish to retain. This Loctite will generally have to be removed with the assistance of heat. Meaning you will have to use a small torch to heat the area and then remove the part loctite’d.
  1. Loctite 680 or equivalent: For pins, sight bases, sight dovetails, etc.. This Loctite is rarely use, but it still has some application retaining stubborn parts that continue to vibrate from where you want. You will generally have to remove the part with the assistance of heat just like the 271.

Note: Always clean all oil off the parts with alcohol or acetone before applying the Loctite. Follow the instructions on the Loctite bottle for proper cleaning and application instructions.

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